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Let's create a healthy environment for the girl children where they can grow without any discrimination

At a time, when people are championing equality for girl children, a section of the society still regards the girl child as a liability. The thinking that boys deserve more than ...

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At a time, when people are championing equality for girl children, a section of the society still regards the girl child as a liability. The thinking that boys deserve more than girls arises from our age-old societal construct. Cases of female foeticide, violation of basic human rights, physical and mental abuse, gender inequality, etc., are still prevalent and yet to be fully erased.
It is our duty to create a healthy environment for the girl children where they can grow without any fear and humiliation. A girl with proper access to resources today will become an empowered woman tomorrow. She should be able to pursue her dreams without any inhibitions.

On the occasion of National Girl Child Day, MyGov Assam seeks your suggestions on how can the various stakeholders contribute toward all round development of the girl children? Do you think the society is still lagging behind in ensuring safety for the girls? What are some steps you believe could help spread awareness toward safeguarding rights, dignity and aspirations of the girl child?

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Because they are girls
Often, girls are marginalised and are out of school simply because they are girls and it is not the cultural norm. Their chances of getting a quality education are even smaller if they come from a poor family, live in a rural area or have a disability.Girls are four times more likely to be out of school than boys from the same background.The poorest girls also have the least likelihood of completing primary school.There are often legal, religious and traditional

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Natural disasters
Unforeseen events such as earthquakes, floods and disease can derail education for millions of girls.

In humanitarian emergencies, including natural disasters, increased poverty for families and lack of employment opportunities means girls are at higher risk of early marriage or ending up in prostitution.

Even if schools are still standing, families whose livelihoods have been destroyed may no longer be able to afford to send their daughters to school.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Their countries are poor
Some of the poorest countries in the world struggle to finance an education system for all their children.

But evidence shows that if we invest more in education, poverty is reduced at a faster rate, there are long-term health benefits and greater gender equality.

An educated female population also increases a country's productivity and fuels economic growth. Some countries lose more than $1 billion a year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Disabilities
Girls with disabilities face discrimination both because of their gender and their disability, making them among the most marginalised groups of children.

Respondents to the World Health Survey 2002-2004 indicated that 41.7% of girls with a disability completed primary school compared to 52.9% for those without a disability.
Disabled girls are almost "invisible" in existing education programmes in many parts of the world, according to the charity Leonard Cheshire Disability.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

They live in war zones
The long-term effects of growing up in a conflict zone are devastating and UNICEF estimates that 48.5 million children worldwide are missing school because of wars and conflicts.

Girls living in conflict-affected countries are 90% more likely to be out of secondary school than those living in peace.

Attacks on girls' schools also mean many parents are afraid to send their daughters to school.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Too few female teachers
The lack of female teachers in some countries can make school a daunting experience for girls. The presence of more women would provide a girl-friendly environment that would put young girls at ease.

In the United States, about three-quarters of school teachers are female. But in African countries such as Liberia and the Central African Republic only about one in five primary teachers are women.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Poor sanitation
In many parts of the world it’s not as easy as raising your hand and asking to go to the toilet.
Many girls - particularly adolescents who are menstruating - don't go to school because of a lack of privacy, unavailability of sanitary disposal facilities and water shortages.

In parts of sub-Saharan Africa and other regions, girls can miss out on up to five days of school per month or stop going to school entirely because of insufficient access to water and hygiene facilities

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

Dangerous journeys
Most parents are unwilling to allow their daughters to walk long distances to school or take routes that could be dangerous.

During violent conflicts, girls are deliberately targeted by armed groups and government forces. They often suffer sexual violence, abduction, intimidation and harassment.

A study in India in 2016 found that half of all girls were sexually harassed on the way to school - including being leered at, pinched or groped.

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Bhawna 1 month 3 weeks ago

5. Child/domestic labour
Girls often stay home to take care of younger siblings and bear the main burden of housework. While educating a boy is considered a sound investment, it is sometimes considered to be a waste of time for girls.

Many girls begin working as early as five years old - mainly in agriculture or in homes as domestic servants. Child domestic workers are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, forced labour, sexual violence and many health issues.